There’s a link between cannabis and psychosis, but it’s more complicated than it seems

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This week, a published study announced that potent cannabis significantly increases the risk of psychosis. So much so, found the authors of The Lancet paper, that around 30% of first-episode psychosis experiences in London and 50% of those in Amsterdam could be prevented if high-potency cannabis were not available in those cities.

Those findings are of course concerning, and they’re part of a body of work showing the link between marijuana and poor mental health: Earlier research found cannabis is associated with psychotic symptoms, such as paranoia; scientists issued a public health warning about the drug in 2016; and a recently published book on marijuana, Tell Your Children, highlights a 2013 paper that found a link between weed and violence, as well as increased rates in violence in the state of Washington shortly after it legalized weed in 2012.

This week, a published study announced that potent cannabis significantly increases the risk of psychosis. So much so, found the authors of The Lancet paper, that around 30% of first-episode psychosis experiences in London and 50% of those in Amsterdam could be prevented if high-potency cannabis were not available in those cities.

Those findings are of course concerning, and they’re part of a body of work showing the link between marijuana and poor mental health: Earlier research found cannabis is associated with psychotic symptoms, such as paranoia; scientists issued a public health warning about the drug in 2016; and a recently published book on marijuana, Tell Your Children, highlights a 2013 paper that found a link between weed and violence, as well as increased rates in violence in the state of Washington shortly after it legalized weed in 2012.

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